M.C.Escher Box

Hey folks, here’s a box I worked on just for fun. It features a design by the Dutch artist M.C.Escher which he termed as a ‘regular division of a plane with two congruent motifs’, which in this context means two images with the same size and shape as one another tessellate together in a contiguous and predictable pattern over the working surface.

M.C.Escher Box

Escher began these works in 1936 after a visit to the Alhambra, a 14th century Moorish castle in Granada, Spain. During his time there, studying the complex majolica tile designs which covered the walls and floors, he considered it a pity that Islam did not permit the depiction of ‘graven images’, and the artists restricted themselves to creating designs of an abstract geometrical type.

Inspired by the beauty of the Moorish tile decorations, Escher began to add aspects of nature into his tessellated designs, including reptiles, fish, birds, people, angels and demons, and creatures both real and invented. He never lost interest in this sphere and continued to create ever more complex works throughout his life, numbering over 130 by 1969, when he completed his last work.

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